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Preliminary study on the application of visible–near infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics to classify Riesling wines from different countries

L. Liu, D. Cozzolino, W.U. Cynkar, R.G. Dambergs, L. Janik, B.K. O’Neill, C.B. Colby, and M. Gishen, Food Chemistry,Volume 106, Issue 2, January 2008,

Visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics was used in an attempt to classify commercial Riesling wines from different countries (Australia, New Zealand, France and Germany). Commercial Riesling wines (n = 50) were scanned in the VIS and NIR regions (400–2500 nm) in a monochromator instrument, in transmission mode. Principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) based on PCA scores were used to classify Riesling wines according to their country of origin. Full cross validation (leave-one-out) was used as the validation method when classification models were developed. PLS-DA models correctly classified 97.5%, 80% and 70.5% of the Australian, New Zealand and European (France and Germany) Riesling wines, respectively. SLDA calibration models correctly classified 86%, 67%, 67% and 87.5% of the Australian, New Zealand, French and German Riesling wines, respectively. These results demonstrated that the VIS and NIR spectra contain information that when used with chemometrics allow discrimination between wines from different countries. To further validate the ability of VIS–NIR to classify white wine samples, a larger sample set will be required. (We recommend that you consult the full text of this article)
Published on 24/06/2008
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