italianoenglishfranÁaisdeutschespaŮolportuguÍs
Language
Search
  • » News
  • » Why some red wines taste 'dry'
  • Vicente Ferreira , LAAE, Universidad de Zaragoza
    VIDEO SEMINAR ENOFORUM 2018: 70% of commercial wines contain, without it being evident, the aromas that will cause their aromatic degradation when free SO2 level decreases. Essentially there are tw...
    Price:15 €(Tax included)
    Published on: 17/01/2019

Why some red wines taste 'dry'

Why some red wines taste 'dry'

Wine connoisseurs can easily discriminate a dry red wine, such as Cabernet Sauvignon, from a fruitier red, like Pinot Noir. Scientists have long linked the "dryness" sensation in wine to tannins, but how these molecules create their characteristic mouthfeel over time is not fully understood. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have found that tannin structure, concentration and interactions with saliva and other wine components influence the perception of dryness.

The dryness sensation, also known as astringency, refers to a puckering or rough feeling in the mouth upon drinking wine. Scientists know that wine drinkers perceive astringency when tannins and salivary proteins interact, aggregate and precipitate, which makes the mouth less lubricated. But Aude Watrelot, Hildegarde Heymann and Andrew Waterhouse wanted to explore how tannins from two different wines interact with other characteristics of the beverages, as well as with salivary proteins, to influence dryness perception.

The researchers extracted the tannins from a dry (Cabernet Sauvignon) and less-dry (Pinot Noir) red wine. Through various analyses, they found that the Cabernet Sauvignon contained more, larger and more highly pigmented tannins than the Pinot Noir, and these tannins formed more protein aggregates in saliva.

Trained sensory panelists perceived Cabernet as dryer, with a longer-lasting dryness, than the Pinot. Interestingly, when the opposite type of tannin was put into Cabernet or Pinot wines, the panelists could not detect differences in dryness. So, for example, when Cabernet tannins were added to a Pinot wine, the drink appeared to have the same dryness as the original Pinot. However, when Cabernet tannins were added to a model wine (ethanol and tartaric acid in water), panelists rated the dryness intensity and duration higher than that of the original model wine. Therefore, the distinctive aromas of the two red wines likely influenced the panelists' perception of dryness, preventing them from noticing the added tannins.

These results could help winemakers manage dryness perception based on wine composition and tannin characteristics, the researchers say.

Reference article:
Red Wine Dryness Perception Related to Physicochemistry; Aude A. Watrelot, Hildegarde Heymann, and Andrew L. Waterhouse; Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry Article ASAP; DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.9b01480

Published on 10/05/2019
Related sheets
  • Grapevines winter pruning
    In the context of Action 7 of the ValorinVitis Project, the first session of "school in the vineyard" for foreign refugees was held on March 13, 2018. The group of 15 refugees managed by the cooper...
    Published on:20/03/2018
  • The 2016 California winegrape harvest was early, with a mostly normal yield of exceptional quality fruit throughout the state. A relatively even growing season followed welcome winter rains that he...
    Published on:01/11/2016
  • The fifth edition of the International Grenaches du Monde Competition, launched in 2013 by the Conseil Interprofessionnel des Vins du Roussillon (CIVR – Interprofessional Board of Roussillon ...
    Published on:19/02/2017
  • Entries open in September 2016 and close on 28 February 2017.
    The OIV Awards rewards the best works published over the past two previous years which provide an original and relevant contribution, with an international significance for the vine and wine sector...
    Published on:23/08/2016
  • Grants offered within the framework of this programme are short term (six months to fifteen months maximum) and are provided for specific post graduate training programmes
    Published on:29/07/2017
  • Who is active, entertaining, educating the masses, and sharing on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and the other platforms today?
    Published on:05/02/2017
© All Right Reserved
ISSN 1826-1590 VAT: IT01286830334
powered by Infonet Srl Piacenza
Privacy Policy
This website and its related third-party services make use of cookies necessary for the purposes described in the cookie policy. If you want to learn more about cookies or how to disable them (either totally or partially), please see the cookie policy. By closing this banner, scrolling through this page, clicking on a link or continuing navigation in any other way, you consent to the use of cookies.
More informationOK

- A +
ExecTime : 1,90625