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How Many Bubbles in Your Glass of Bubbly?

Gérard Liger-Belair; The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 2014 118 (11), 3156-3163

The issue about how many carbon dioxide bubbles are likely to nucleate in a glass of champagne (or bubbly) is of concern for sommeliers, wine journalists, experienced tasters, and any open minded physical chemist wondering about complex phenomena at play in a glass of bubbly.

The whole number of bubbles likely to form in a single glass is the result of the fine interplay between dissolved CO2, tiny gas pockets trapped within particles acting as bubble nucleation sites, and ascending bubble dynamics.

Based on theoretical models combining ascending bubble dynamics and mass transfer equations, the falsely naý̈ve question of how many bubbles are likely to form per glass is discussed in the present work.

A theoretical relationship is derived, which provides the whole number of bubbles likely to form per glass, depending on various parameters of both the wine and the glass itself.

(We recommend that you consult the full text of this article)

Published on 12/01/2015
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